Boys’ Basketball: Legend vs. Chaparral, February 20, 2015

Connor Mccord, 11, and Chris Moody (Chaparral), 12, go for the jump ball at the beginning of the game.

Connor Mccord, 11, and Chris Moody (Chaparral), 12, go for the jump ball at the beginning of the game.

Jared Small, 11, focuses on the ball and Jake Holtzman, 12, from Chaparral

Jared Small, 11, focuses on the ball and Jake Holtzman (Chaparral), 12.

The Coliseum Crazies show off their Titan spirit by wearing all white.

The Coliseum Crazies show off their Titan spirit by wearing all white.

The Coliseum Crazies show off their Titan spirit by wearing all white.

The Coliseum Crazies show off their Titan spirit by wearing all white.

MJ Atchey, 12, leads the Coliseum Crazies in riding "The Titan".

MJ Atchey, 12, leads the Coliseum Crazies in riding “The Titan”.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Monroe Porter, 11,  goes up for a shot, leading to a foul and two made free throws.

Monroe Porter, 11, goes up for a shot, leading to a foul and two made free throws.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Riley Matticks, 11.

Monroe Porter, 11.

Monroe Porter, 11.

Riley Matticks, 11, shoots and makes the free throw that helps to seal the game, leading to Legend's 68-62 victory.

Riley Matticks, 11, shoots and makes the free throw that helps to seal the game, leading to Legend’s 68-62 victory.

Girls’ Basketball: Legend vs. Chaparral, February 20, 2015

Putt-Putt Night

Penny Stalls

Sadie’s Week 2015- Fire and Ice Day

School Store

By Taylor Hourigan

When walking down the lower hallway to the lunch room, students may notice a new development settled where a janitor’s store room used to be. If they choose to walk inside, they will find anything from candy to cookies to spirit wear–DECA’s school store is in full swing.

The store opened on October 22 after about two months of construction to advertisements on the School’s website and daily announcements.

Open all periods A days and B days except for eighth period, the store is operated by student volunteers who can receive extra credit for Mrs. Becker’s Level One and Two Marketing classes. Two such volunteers are junior Emily Vance and senior Teller Hoskins.

“We see about twenty-five people a day, usually,” Hoskins said. “Most people just walk by”

Spirit wear can be bought at the store, including Legend scarves, lanyards, hats, sweatshirts and t-shirts.

Food, such as coffee, cookies, instant ramen noodles, pistachios, popcorn, tea, and even the only soda available for student purchase–Fresca–are also stocked for purchase.

“Our most popular item is probably the popcorn. I don’t think people really know exactly what we have in the store,” Vance said. “I think they’d be surprised if they walked in, actually.”

DECA Wolverine Competition

By Tara Higgins

Designed to test marketing knowledge and skills in real-life applications, the 2014 DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America) Wolverine Invitational offered 40 students the opportunity to participate in a day of individual and team events at the Denver Tech Center Marriott Hotel on Oct. 24.

500 DECA members from Legend, Chaparral, Douglas County, Rock Canyon, Mountain Vista, and Arapahoe High Schools participated in this year’s invitational.

“This was the first competitive DECA event for [us] this year,” DECA adviser Mrs. Becker said.

The Wolverine Competition was modeled after DECA state competitions, according to senior Patrick Forsyth. Success in the event requires you to be able to model the professional business situations which are included in each role play.

“My favorite part was being able to compete with my friends, and getting to know the other students there,” Forsyth said.

Participants are assigned a subject, or role play, and must take the corresponding 100 question multiple-choice test. They are then given 20 minutes to prepare a plan, and 10 minutes to present before the judges.

With subjects in Principles of Marketing, Quick Serve Restaurant, Apparel and Accessories, Business Law and Ethics, and Hotel and Lodging Management, the Wolverine Competition features a variety of subjects catered to suit any participant’s strengths in marketing.

Attendees can work both individually and as a team in their subjects, as did juniors Alex Berry and Kevin Elkin, who placed second in Business Law and Ethics. They were the only team from Legend to win an award, even though it was their first time competing with no prior experience.

Despite the disadvantages of the short time allotted for planning and the time limits in presenting, being familiar with their subject and having background knowledge helped the team pull together.

Senior Will Curtin, who placed third in Hotel and Lodging, believes this year’s competition was a good start for new DECA kids.

Preparing for tests and familiarizing yourself with the different marketing subjects are both ways future DECA members can ensure they are ready for next year’s competition. “If you keep practicing and if you know what to expect it gets easier,” DECA president senior Auggie Mustillo said.

Mrs. Becker is extremely proud of all of the Wolverine participants.

“Each student represented themselves and [our school] in a poised and professional manner,” she said.

Currently, DECA students are preparing for their next competitive event. It will be the DECA District Competition and the qualifying event for State, which will be held on Nov. 17.

With so many more students becoming involved, DECA membership and participation in competitions is quickly growing.

“[DECA membership] looks good on any resume,” Forsyth said. “These are skills you’ll use for the rest of your life, whether it’s a job interview or any other professional business situation.”

NAHS Celebrates Halloween with Pumpkin Palooza Once Again

By Prisca To

Halloween is a holiday celebrated by people all over the world, regardless of age. There are halloween parties, events, and trick or treating. On Wednesday, October 29 NAHS hosted the Pumpkin Palooza for the fourth year in a row.

“Pumpkin Palooza is a free community/family event that provides a venue for families to carve and paint pumpkins together in a Halloween themed environment,” NAHS sponsor Modesitt said. “There are games, food, prizes, face painting,  a “pumpkin patch”, and stations to carve and paint pumpkins.”

Students within NAHS all have a specific role. Senior Haley Kinslow was in charge of face-painting the children.

“We had a really good turn out, Kinslow said. “Lots of kids came and it was really fun.”

NAHS President Madi Hansen was the event coordinator for the palooza. She joined NAHS as a sophomore for community service opportunities and a way to express her artistic ability.

“The event allows students in NAHS to get creative, work with kids, and use their artistic abilities to uplift other people,” Hansen said.

Kinslow’s favorite part of the event was seeing the kids in costumes and having a good time.

“The Pumpkin Palooza is one my favorite events. I always have a good time with the little kids,” Kinslow said.

The Pumpkin Palooza grows in popularity every year, with returning and new kids. NAHS plans on doing the event for many more years.

“It is so much fun to watch families interact in a safe and positive environment. We usually have a couple hundred people through the doors and ages range from baby to grandma,” said Modesitt. “Students create and run all the games and make themed treats…usually enough to induce sugar comas.”

Jeans 4 Teens

By Doann Tran

If you’ve been waiting for a chance to get rid of your old jeans and donate them to a good cause, you’re finally in luck. Legend’s Interact club, sponsored by Volunteer Coordinator Tamara Krause, started a Jean Drive to help out two local shelters, Urban Peak and Excelsior School for Girls.​

“I think the concept of giving, and trying to help those that may not have as much as we do is something everyone should learn more about,” Krause said.

At the moment, Krause is extremely hopefully about the turnout of this event because she’s heard that there’s a big “buzz around and a lot more jeans are coming.” Krause has been passionate about helping others and and wants people to  help someone new every day.

“I love knowing that what little I do in my part of the big world can make even a small impact. We can all help others, every day, through any kind word or gesture, someone who may need ​a smile, a hug, or help with their homework,” Krause said.

This Jean drive is dedicated to teenagers who aren’t as fortunate as we are. The drive was collecting jeans in any size or style, worn or ripped, and it’ll make sure that the jeans get to the teenagers who need them the most in Colorado.

“We hope that in the future we can do something similar to this and continue to help the less fortunate,” club President Rebecca Subzwari said.

“Service Above Self,” is the basic premise of Interact club and it means to put others before yourself. This club has a big part in organizing volunteer activities all around Parker. From wearing character costumes down on Mainstreet to pass out candy on Halloween, to helping out with the “That Girl” conference, this club strives to give back to the community in any way.

“Ever since the interact club was created, I have wanted to be apart of it. I love helping the community and learning new things about helping others and becoming a leader,” said Subzwari, “even the littlest thing can make a huge difference to someone else.”

Leadership Runs In The Family

By Emma Polzer

We see them at football games, pep assemblies, and band competitions. The marching band is a big part of what happens at Legend and where we get our spirit, but who gives them their spirit? That person is the drum major, who for the last two years was Trevor Kimbrel.

As the new band season is about to begin, a new drum major had to be appointed because Kimbrel graduated. However, the Kimbrel era is not over yet, for soon-to-be-senior Hallie Kimbrel will take over for her brother this coming summer.

“I haven’t tried to fill in [Trevor’s] shoes. Right now I’m just trying to be my own drum major,” Hallie says about taking over for her brother. She is determined to make the band the best it can be and put her own spin on the way things used to be.

Starting something new and as big as becoming the drum major is intimidating to a lot of kids but Hallie says she’s “really excited to see how the band grows this year and hopefully have them strive to do their best”.

Before band camp begins later in the summer, Hallie will be attending camps made specifically for drum majors that teaches them how to be a leader and works to improve their conducting skills. In order to make the band the best it can be, Hallie will be practicing her music in order to know the music inside and out.

Hallie knows that she has to be a good leader and has been thinking “in [her] head of ways [she] can help the band and what [she] can do to be the best drum major [she] can be,”. This summer she will be mentally preparing herself and getting into that leadership role that will be expected of her later this year.

After these few weeks of creating a clear foundation for herself, Hallie will be leading the band at the first football game and throughout the year at competitions and assemblies to follow.

Hallie Kimbrel and Matt Smith get announced to be drum major and assistant drum major at the band banquet.

Hallie Kimbrel and Matt Smith get announced to be drum major and assistant drum major at the band banquet.